CREON Bite-sized
Education Series

CREON Bite-sized Education Series

This video series is an easy way to learn more about EPI and CREON.

View transcript

What is EPI?

Narrator2,3:

I want to talk to you today about a condition that affects digestion called exocrine pancreatic insufficiency.

Phew- That’s a mouthful - Let’s just call it EPI.

So, what do you need to know?

Well, EPI can happen when your pancreas isn’t producing enough digestive enzymes.

Most people don’t even realize that the pancreas plays an important role in digestion.

Think of your digestive system as a factory that is constantly working to help break down your food and turn it into energy.

Your mouth helps start this process by breaking down your food into pieces that are small enough to be swallowed.

When these food pieces reach the stomach, they mix with gastric juices that help break the food down even more.

Once the broken-down food enters the small intestine, it’s time for the pancreas to do its job.

The pancreas makes enzymes that break down the fats, proteins and carbohydrates found in food, which are called nutrients....

...so that they can be absorbed in the intestines and used by the body.

When you have EPI, your pancreas isn’t fully functional,...

...so food doesn’t get broken down properly.

This is called maldigestion.

Undigested food in your intestines can result in digestive issues...

....and because your food isn’t broken down properly, your body can’t fully absorb the nutrients you need.

This is called malabsorption.

You should know that EPI is typically a chronic condition, but the good news is, it is manageable. So it’s important to talk to your healthcare provider.

CREON is a prescription medicine used to treat people who cannot digest food normally because their pancreas does not make enough enzymes due to cystic fibrosis, chronic pancreatitis (which is the swelling of the pancreas that lasts a long time), pancreatectomy (which is the removal of some or all of the pancreas), or other conditions.

CREON & food

Narrator1,2:

When you have EPI, your pancreas is not producing the enzymes that you need to help break down your food...

...so that’s why your healthcare provider may have prescribed CREON, pancrelipase.

CREON® is a prescription medicine used to treat people who cannot digest food normally because their pancreas does not make enough enzymes...

...due to cystic fibrosis, chronic pancreatitis (which is the swelling of the pancreas that lasts a long time), pancreatectomy (which is the removal of some or all of the pancreas), or other conditions.

CREON can help your body replace the enzymes your pancreas isn’t making and break down the foods you eat.

In order for CREON to do this, it always needs to go along with your food...

...at every meal and snack.

It’s not like other medications that need to be taken just once or twice per day.

You can’t just take it in the morning and be done.

So, do you need to take CREON with your morning breakfast smoothie?

YES!

With your sandwich at lunch?

YES!

With your afternoon energy bar?

YES!

When you’re having dinner at a restaurant?

YES!

A couple of other things to keep in mind:

When you’re taking CREON, make sure to drink enough liquid to swallow the capsules completely.

Also, CREON shouldn’t be crushed or chewed and should be stored at room-temperature, and kept in a dry place.

Remember, CREON goes with your food, so make sure it always goes with you.

CREON is a prescription medicine used to treat people who cannot digest food normally because their pancreas does not make enough enzymes due to cystic fibrosis, chronic pancreatitis (which is the swelling of the pancreas that lasts a long time), pancreatectomy (which is the removal of some or all of the pancreas), or other conditions.

How CREON works

Narrator1:

CREON, pancrelipase, is a prescription medicine that works by replacing the pancreatic enzymes that are missing in people who have EPI due to cystic fibrosis, chronic pancreatitis (which is the swelling of the pancreas that lasts a long time), pancreatectomy (which is the removal of some or all of the pancreas), or other conditions.

CREON needs to be taken with every meal and snack, and there’s a good reason why.

Your pancreas PRODUCES enzymes every time you eat...

...so CREON is used to REPLACE those enzymes every time you eat.

It’s important to always take CREON with a meal or snack and enough liquid to swallow the capsules completely.

Also, be sure not to chew or crush CREON capsules

In order to work, CREON needs to get to the right location in the body to do its job...

...and it needs to travel down the digestive tract with your food.

Timing is key. CREON and food need to get on board together...

...so that they reach their destination together.

CREON has a special coating to make sure it reaches the starting point of your small intestine (which is called your duodenum).

Your duodenum is where CREON releases enzymes to break down the fats, proteins and carbohydrates in your food...

...so that they can be absorbed and used by your body.

So remember, if you have EPI, CREON can help break down your food so that nutrients can get to their final destination.

CREON is a prescription medicine used to treat people who cannot digest food normally because their pancreas does not make enough enzymes due to cystic fibrosis, chronic pancreatitis (which is the swelling of the pancreas that lasts a long time), pancreatectomy (which is the removal of some or all of the pancreas), or other conditions.

Understanding your CREON dose

Narrator1:

If you’ve been prescribed CREON, pancrelipase, there are a few things you should know to help keep your therapy on track.

CREON replaces the enzymes that your pancreas normally produces in order to help you digest and absorb food.

Your CREON dose is tailored just for you based on your individual needs.

It’s important to take CREON as prescribed by your healthcare provider. He or she will determine an appropriate dose for you based on the following three things:

Your weight,...

...the types of foods that you prefer to eat,...

...and your symptoms.

Since EPI is typically a chronic condition, these things may change over time. Talk to your healthcare provider because he or she may need to adjust your CREON dose.

That’s why it’s important to keep track of things like your diet, your symptoms, your weight, and when you’re taking your CREON...

...and to share this information with your healthcare provider at your next appointment.

CREON is a prescription medicine used to treat people who cannot digest food normally because their pancreas does not make enough enzymes due to cystic fibrosis, chronic pancreatitis (which is the swelling of the pancreas that lasts a long time), pancreatectomy (which is the removal of some or all of the pancreas), or other conditions.

Uses

CREON is a prescription medicine used to treat people who cannot digest food normally because their pancreas does not make enough enzymes due to cystic fibrosis, chronic pancreatitis (which is the swelling of the pancreas that lasts a long time), pancreatectomy (which is the removal of some or all of the pancreas), or other conditions.

Important Safety Information

  • CREON may increase your chance of having a rare bowel disorder called fibrosing colonopathy. The risk of having this condition may be reduced by following the dosing instructions that your doctor gave you.
  • Do not crush or chew CREON capsules or its contents, and do not hold the capsule or capsule contents in your mouth. Crushing, chewing, or holding the CREON capsules in your mouth may cause irritation in your mouth. Talk to your doctor or consult the CREON Medication Guide for how to take CREON if you have trouble swallowing capsules. Always take CREON with a meal or snack and enough liquid to swallow CREON completely. Take CREON exactly as your doctor tells you.
  • Tell your doctor right away if you have unusual or severe: stomach or abdominal pain, bloating, trouble passing stool, nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, worsening of painful, swollen joints (gout), or allergic reactions including trouble with breathing, skin rashes, or swollen lips.
  • The most common side effects include: increased or decreased blood sugars, pain in your stomach area, frequent or abnormal bowel movements, gas, vomiting, dizziness, or sore throat and cough.
  • CREON and other pancreatic enzyme products are made from the pancreas of pigs, the same pigs people eat as pork. These pigs may carry viruses. Although it has never been reported, it may be possible for a person to get a viral infection from taking pancreatic enzyme products that come from pigs.

Refer to the CREON Medication Guide and full Prescribing Information every time you refill your prescription because information may change. Tell your healthcare provider if you have any symptom or side effect that bothers you or does not go away.

You are encouraged to report negative adverse effects of prescription drugs to the FDA. Visit www.fda.gov/medwatch or call 1-800-FDA-1088.

If you cannot afford your medication, contact www.pparx.org.

Please see the full Prescribing Information, including Medication Guide, provided on this website and discuss it with your doctor.

What Is EPI video

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What is EPI?

5:03

CREON & Food video

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CREON & food

5:05

How CREON Works video

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How CREON works

5:05

Understanding Your CREON Dose video

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Understanding your CREON dose

4:27

Video Transcript

What is EPI?

Narrator2,3:

I want to talk to you today about a condition that affects digestion called exocrine pancreatic insufficiency.

Phew- That’s a mouthful - Let’s just call it EPI.

So, what do you need to know?

Well, EPI can happen when your pancreas isn’t producing enough digestive enzymes.

Most people don’t even realize that the pancreas plays an important role in digestion.

Think of your digestive system as a factory that is constantly working to help break down your food and turn it into energy.

Your mouth helps start this process by breaking down your food into pieces that are small enough to be swallowed.

When these food pieces reach the stomach, they mix with gastric juices that help break the food down even more.

Once the broken-down food enters the small intestine, it’s time for the pancreas to do its job.

The pancreas makes enzymes that break down the fats, proteins and carbohydrates found in food, which are called nutrients....

...so that they can be absorbed in the intestines and used by the body.

When you have EPI, your pancreas isn’t fully functional,...

...so food doesn’t get broken down properly.

This is called maldigestion.

Undigested food in your intestines can result in digestive issues...

....and because your food isn’t broken down properly, your body can’t fully absorb the nutrients you need.

This is called malabsorption.

You should know that EPI is typically a chronic condition, but the good news is, it is manageable. So it’s important to talk to your healthcare provider.

CREON is a prescription medicine used to treat people who cannot digest food normally because their pancreas does not make enough enzymes due to cystic fibrosis, chronic pancreatitis (which is the swelling of the pancreas that lasts a long time), pancreatectomy (which is the removal of some or all of the pancreas), or other conditions.

CREON & food

Narrator1,2:

When you have EPI, your pancreas is not producing the enzymes that you need to help break down your food...

...so that’s why your healthcare provider may have prescribed CREON, pancrelipase.

CREON® is a prescription medicine used to treat people who cannot digest food normally because their pancreas does not make enough enzymes...

...due to cystic fibrosis, chronic pancreatitis (which is the swelling of the pancreas that lasts a long time), pancreatectomy (which is the removal of some or all of the pancreas), or other conditions.

CREON can help your body replace the enzymes your pancreas isn’t making and break down the foods you eat.

In order for CREON to do this, it always needs to go along with your food...

...at every meal and snack.

It’s not like other medications that need to be taken just once or twice per day.

You can’t just take it in the morning and be done.

So, do you need to take CREON with your morning breakfast smoothie?

YES!

With your sandwich at lunch?

YES!

With your afternoon energy bar?

YES!

When you’re having dinner at a restaurant?

YES!

A couple of other things to keep in mind:

When you’re taking CREON, make sure to drink enough liquid to swallow the capsules completely.

Also, CREON shouldn’t be crushed or chewed and should be stored at room-temperature, and kept in a dry place.

Remember, CREON goes with your food, so make sure it always goes with you.

CREON is a prescription medicine used to treat people who cannot digest food normally because their pancreas does not make enough enzymes due to cystic fibrosis, chronic pancreatitis (which is the swelling of the pancreas that lasts a long time), pancreatectomy (which is the removal of some or all of the pancreas), or other conditions.

How CREON works

Narrator1:

CREON, pancrelipase, is a prescription medicine that works by replacing the pancreatic enzymes that are missing in people who have EPI due to cystic fibrosis, chronic pancreatitis (which is the swelling of the pancreas that lasts a long time), pancreatectomy (which is the removal of some or all of the pancreas), or other conditions.

CREON needs to be taken with every meal and snack, and there’s a good reason why.

Your pancreas PRODUCES enzymes every time you eat...

...so CREON is used to REPLACE those enzymes every time you eat.

It’s important to always take CREON with a meal or snack and enough liquid to swallow the capsules completely.

Also, be sure not to chew or crush CREON capsules

In order to work, CREON needs to get to the right location in the body to do its job...

...and it needs to travel down the digestive tract with your food.

Timing is key. CREON and food need to get on board together...

...so that they reach their destination together.

CREON has a special coating to make sure it reaches the starting point of your small intestine (which is called your duodenum).

Your duodenum is where CREON releases enzymes to break down the fats, proteins and carbohydrates in your food...

...so that they can be absorbed and used by your body.

So remember, if you have EPI, CREON can help break down your food so that nutrients can get to their final destination.

CREON is a prescription medicine used to treat people who cannot digest food normally because their pancreas does not make enough enzymes due to cystic fibrosis, chronic pancreatitis (which is the swelling of the pancreas that lasts a long time), pancreatectomy (which is the removal of some or all of the pancreas), or other conditions.

Understanding your CREON dose

Narrator1:

If you’ve been prescribed CREON, pancrelipase, there are a few things you should know to help keep your therapy on track.

CREON replaces the enzymes that your pancreas normally produces in order to help you digest and absorb food.

Your CREON dose is tailored just for you based on your individual needs.

It’s important to take CREON as prescribed by your healthcare provider. He or she will determine an appropriate dose for you based on the following three things:

Your weight,...

...the types of foods that you prefer to eat,...

...and your symptoms.

Since EPI is typically a chronic condition, these things may change over time. Talk to your healthcare provider because he or she may need to adjust your CREON dose.

That’s why it’s important to keep track of things like your diet, your symptoms, your weight, and when you’re taking your CREON...

...and to share this information with your healthcare provider at your next appointment.

CREON is a prescription medicine used to treat people who cannot digest food normally because their pancreas does not make enough enzymes due to cystic fibrosis, chronic pancreatitis (which is the swelling of the pancreas that lasts a long time), pancreatectomy (which is the removal of some or all of the pancreas), or other conditions.

Uses

CREON is a prescription medicine used to treat people who cannot digest food normally because their pancreas does not make enough enzymes due to cystic fibrosis, chronic pancreatitis (which is the swelling of the pancreas that lasts a long time), pancreatectomy (which is the removal of some or all of the pancreas), or other conditions.

Important Safety Information

  • CREON may increase your chance of having a rare bowel disorder called fibrosing colonopathy. The risk of having this condition may be reduced by following the dosing instructions that your doctor gave you.
  • Do not crush or chew CREON capsules or its contents, and do not hold the capsule or capsule contents in your mouth. Crushing, chewing, or holding the CREON capsules in your mouth may cause irritation in your mouth. Talk to your doctor or consult the CREON Medication Guide for how to take CREON if you have trouble swallowing capsules. Always take CREON with a meal or snack and enough liquid to swallow CREON completely. Take CREON exactly as your doctor tells you.
  • Tell your doctor right away if you have unusual or severe: stomach or abdominal pain, bloating, trouble passing stool, nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, worsening of painful, swollen joints (gout), or allergic reactions including trouble with breathing, skin rashes, or swollen lips.
  • The most common side effects include: increased or decreased blood sugars, pain in your stomach area, frequent or abnormal bowel movements, gas, vomiting, dizziness, or sore throat and cough.
  • CREON and other pancreatic enzyme products are made from the pancreas of pigs, the same pigs people eat as pork. These pigs may carry viruses. Although it has never been reported, it may be possible for a person to get a viral infection from taking pancreatic enzyme products that come from pigs.

Refer to the CREON Medication Guide and full Prescribing Information every time you refill your prescription because information may change. Tell your healthcare provider if you have any symptom or side effect that bothers you or does not go away.

You are encouraged to report negative adverse effects of prescription drugs to the FDA. Visit www.fda.gov/medwatch or call 1-800-FDA-1088.

If you cannot afford your medication, contact www.pparx.org.

Please see the full Prescribing Information, including Medication Guide, provided on this website and discuss it with your doctor.

Uses and Important Safety Information

Uses1

CREON is a prescription medicine used to treat people who cannot digest food normally because their pancreas does not make enough enzymes due to cystic fibrosis, swelling of the pancreas that lasts a long time (chronic pancreatitis), removal of some or all of the pancreas (pancreatectomy), or other conditions.

Important Safety Information

  • CREON may increase your chance of having a rare bowel disorder called fibrosing colonopathy. The risk of having this condition may be reduced by following the dosing instructions that your doctor gave you.
  • Do not crush or chew CREON capsules or its contents, and do not hold the capsule or capsule contents in your mouth. Crushing, chewing, or holding the CREON capsules in your mouth may cause irritation in your mouth. Talk to your doctor or consult the CREON Medication Guide for how to take CREON if you have trouble swallowing capsules. Always take CREON with a meal or snack and enough liquid to swallow CREON completely. Take CREON exactly as your doctor tells you.
  • Tell your doctor right away if you have unusual or severe: stomach (abdominal) pain, bloating, trouble passing stool, nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, worsening of painful, swollen joints (gout), or allergic reactions including trouble with breathing, skin rashes, or swollen lips.
  • The most common side effects include: increased (hyperglycemia) or decreased (hypoglycemia) blood sugars, pain in your stomach area (abdominal area), frequent or abnormal bowel movements, gas, vomiting, dizziness, or sore throat and cough.
  • CREON and other pancreatic enzyme products are made from the pancreas of pigs, the same pigs people eat as pork. These pigs may carry viruses. Although it has never been reported, it may be possible for a person to get a viral infection from taking pancreatic enzyme products that come from pigs.

Refer to the CREON Medication Guide and Full Prescribing Information every time you refill your prescription because information may change. Tell your healthcare provider if you have any symptom or side effect that bothers you or that does not go away.

You are encouraged to report negative adverse effects of prescription drugs to the FDA. Visit www.fda.gov/medwatch or call 1-800-FDA-1088.

If you cannot afford your medication, contact www.pparx.org.

Reference: 1. CREON [package insert]. North Chicago, IL: AbbVie Inc.

  1. References:
  2. CREON [package insert]. North Chicago, IL: AbbVie Inc.
  3. Fieker A, Philpott J, Armand M. Enzyme replacement therapy for pancreatic insufficiency: present and future. Clin Exp Gastroenterol. 2011;4:55-73.
  4. Ferrone M, Raimondo M, Scolapio JS. Pancreatic enzyme pharmacotherapy. Pharmacotherapy. 2007;27(6):910-920.

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